The use of the Individual Ventilatory Threshold (IVT), as parameter to prescribe exercise intensity in individuals with obesity, has become more frequent during the last years. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between IVT and Maximal Fat Oxidation (MFO) in women with obesity. Fifty-two obese female adults (age= 43.6±10.9 years; BMI= 38.5±5.2 kg/m2) were included in this study. According to the BMI classification, subjects were divided into three groups: Obese Class I (OBI, n=16); Obese Class II (OBII, n=20) and Obese Class III (OBIII, n=16). All subjects performed an incremental graded exercise test to evaluate peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), IVT and MFO. MFO was evaluated using a stoichiometric equation. Fat max zone was determined for each subject within 10% of fat oxidation rates at MFO. For each HR, %HRmax, VO2 and %VO2peak variable, Pearson’s correlation test was done between IVT and MFO exercise intensity. When statistical correlation was found we used a comparative statistical analysis to assess differences between IVT and MFO. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. For each HR, %HRmax, VO2 and %VO2peak variable there was a positive significant correlation (P<0.01) between IVT and MFO. No significant differences were found for HR, %HRmax, and VO2 between IVT and MFO. %VO2peak was significantly higher at IVT than at MFO (P=0.03). MFO rates were significantly higher in OBIII women than in women of the other two classes. In all subjects, IVT was within the fat max zone. The use of HR and VO2 corresponding to IVT could be a useful parameter not only to improve cardiorespiratory fitness but also to prescribe physical activity that maximize fat oxidation in obese subjects.

Relationship between individual ventilatory threshold and maximal fat oxidation (MFO) over different obesity classes in women.

Gian Pietro Emerenziani;Carlo Baldari
;
2019-01-01

Abstract

The use of the Individual Ventilatory Threshold (IVT), as parameter to prescribe exercise intensity in individuals with obesity, has become more frequent during the last years. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between IVT and Maximal Fat Oxidation (MFO) in women with obesity. Fifty-two obese female adults (age= 43.6±10.9 years; BMI= 38.5±5.2 kg/m2) were included in this study. According to the BMI classification, subjects were divided into three groups: Obese Class I (OBI, n=16); Obese Class II (OBII, n=20) and Obese Class III (OBIII, n=16). All subjects performed an incremental graded exercise test to evaluate peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), IVT and MFO. MFO was evaluated using a stoichiometric equation. Fat max zone was determined for each subject within 10% of fat oxidation rates at MFO. For each HR, %HRmax, VO2 and %VO2peak variable, Pearson’s correlation test was done between IVT and MFO exercise intensity. When statistical correlation was found we used a comparative statistical analysis to assess differences between IVT and MFO. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. For each HR, %HRmax, VO2 and %VO2peak variable there was a positive significant correlation (P<0.01) between IVT and MFO. No significant differences were found for HR, %HRmax, and VO2 between IVT and MFO. %VO2peak was significantly higher at IVT than at MFO (P=0.03). MFO rates were significantly higher in OBIII women than in women of the other two classes. In all subjects, IVT was within the fat max zone. The use of HR and VO2 corresponding to IVT could be a useful parameter not only to improve cardiorespiratory fitness but also to prescribe physical activity that maximize fat oxidation in obese subjects.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11389/27133
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